Human antifreeze could be running low

NATURAL HEALING PRACTICE for DOGS

December

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the first snowflakes have fallen and the white splendor covers the landscape, it's not just people who are happy. Dogs also enjoy romping around outside. Nevertheless, there are a few things to consider in winter so that our dogs get through the cold season healthy, safe and safe.
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Walks in winter

For dogs that are generally more sensitive to cold, are getting on in years or have joint problems, it is better to shorten the daily walks in freezing temperatures or icy winds. On such days it would be better to go more often and for a shorter time.
If the dog is wet after the walk, it is essential to dry it off with a dry and clean towel! This allows the fur to dry faster and it becomes comfortably warm again sooner.
Do not walk too long with small, old or sick dogs, or ideally not at all in deep snow. For small dogs it is very exhausting to move around in deep snow for a long time and the body cools down very quickly.
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Sometimes ice lumps also form in the abdominal area, which also cools down.
Even old or sick dogs should not move too long in deep snow, especially not if they have joint problems.

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Walks in the dark or in poor visibility, e.g.Blowing snow or fog

It is often not possible for working people to go for a walk before dark.
Please be sure to put a reflective collar or protective vest on the dog.
Also remember to make yourself clearly visible to drivers and cyclists.
Collar and vest in signal color help you to see your own dog better even on cloudy days or heavy snowfall.
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Warning black ice

Dogs can also slip on black ice and injure themselves. These include strains, cruciate ligament tears or, even worse, broken bones.
If possible, you should make sure that you do not walk on a tarred path, but in the grass when dealing with black ice. You should avoid fetching and racing games on icy roads.

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Annoying lumps of ice between your toes

If the dog begins to hobble, ice clumps have likely formed between the toes. This is extremely uncomfortable and often painful for dogs.
One should carefully remove the clumps by hand.

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Road salt and gravel

If possible, paths should be used that are not salted or strewn with gravel. If this is not possible, the paws of very sensitive dogs can also be protected with dog shoes.
After every walk on salted paths, the paws must be cleaned (for example, a bucket with some warm water is sufficient) to remove road salt and gravel, otherwise the dog will clean its paws itself. He can absorb a larger amount of road salt.
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Annotation:
The commercial road salt consists largely of table salt. Ingesting small amounts is not toxic, but caution is still advised. Road salt irritates the dog's stomach lining and in some cases can also contain antifreeze (ethylene glycol). Antifreeze is not only poisonous for dogs, but thanks to its special smell and taste, it encourages them to eat even more snow containing salt.
Just a few drops of ethylene glycol are enough to cause poisoning. The result is severe kidney damage or fatal kidney failure.

See also article from November:
Antifreeze is poisonous for dogs!

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Common illnesses in winter

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Almost all dogs love to play and run around in the snow.
However, many dogs keep picking up chunks of snow while they play happily.
Some people eat their stomachs full of snow.
But eating snow can have serious health consequences!
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Snow gastritis Eating snow
Dogs often react differently to snow intake. Some have no problems, others show symptoms of so-called snow gastritis very quickly. This is an acute gastric mucosal inflammation caused by the ingested snow.
The cold and especially the snow contaminated with bacteria, pollutants from the air, road salt or grit irritate the dog's mucous membranes and the typical symptoms of snow gastritis occur: diarrhea (in severe cases bloody diarrhea), gurgling in the stomach / intestines, Abdominal pain (tense abdominal wall, hunched back), salivation, choking, vomiting, cough, fever.
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Tonsillitis from snow eating
Another consequence of snow eating is often acute tonsillitis. In healthy dogs, the tonsils are hidden in the back of the throat in pockets of the mucous membrane. Inflamed tonsils swell and protrude from the mucous membrane pockets.
The dog perceives the swollen tonsils as a foreign body in the throat and reacts like a real foreign body with throat clearing and choking and vomits white foam.
If these symptoms occur, action must be taken immediately, as delayed tonsillitis can become chronic and damage the heart and joints.
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Sore throat caused by eating snow
The first symptom is usually the cough and the dog shows a straight head and neck posture. The sore throat is both an independent and a partial disease and is caused by viruses or bacteria that are ingested when eating snow.

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Colds
During the cold season, dogs can also develop various colds. The term colds refers to infectious diseases of the upper respiratory tract:
- nose and sinuses
- Throat and pharynx
- bronchi and lungs
Triggers can be various viruses, but sometimes also bacteria.

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Cystitis
When the dogs romp around in the snow, their tummies often get very wet. This can lead to a bladder infection. The first thing the owner notices is that the dog takes a long time to urinate when walking.
Especially in bitches, you can tell when there is a cystitis, especially in the snow. She loses just a few droplets of urine over and over again. In severe cases, urinating is painful and the dog howls.
Often you can even notice blood in the urine, which is particularly easy to see when there is snow. In the case of a cystitis, even if only suspected, immediate action should be taken, as a cystitis can quickly become a kidney problem and can then be life-threatening.

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This is how you can prevent it

 

No long stay in the parked car
Never leave your dog in a cold car.
When the heater is off and the temperature drops quickly, it's cold like a freezer.
The air does not circulate and remains very cold.
Young and very old dogs in particular are much less able to deal with low temperatures than adults.
It is comparable to us humans: Children and older people have a significantly poorer temperature regulation.

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Eating snow
Consistently ban snow-eating!
Do not use balls (e.g. tennis balls) that have snow stuck to them.
If necessary, put your dog in a sealed muzzle before going for a walk in the snow.

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No waiting outside
Do not let the dog wait tied up in front of shops when it is below freezing, not even for a short time.
No long stay in the garden
Your dog's stays in the garden should only be brief in snow and cold.

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Always keep moving
Make sure that your dog is always on the move.
So don't have a little chat with other dog owners or neighbors while your dog is already chattering its teeth!
This can quickly lead to hypothermia and painful bladder and kidney infections.

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Duration of the walks
If your dog is shivering from the cold and exercise is no longer useful, please go home with him quickly.

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Icy wind for the eyes
Check your eyes - in winter, many dogs have eye infections due to the icy wind (especially in a dry east wind).

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Playing in the snow
Do not let the dog fetch too long (risk of coughing or tonsillitis, for example).
Playing with sticks
Do not let them play with sticks, as the cold can split them quickly and there is a high risk of injury.

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Swimming in the lake is prohibited
Forbid the dog to swim in the lake in winter.
He should also not run into streams or drink ice cold water from them.

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winter coat
Protect small, cold-sensitive dogs from the winter cold with a warming, wind- and waterproof coat.
For dogs that have a very short coat without an undercoat or a light coat, adequate protection against cold and wet is also necessary.
A warm, waterproof coat is also necessary for older dogs with kidney damage or back and joint problems.
Dogs with very sensitive paws (e.g. with ball hyperkeratosis) should be protected with dog shoes.

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Grooming
Thorough grooming of the dog's coat is very important in winter. The coat should not be trimmed, sheared or cut, as a full coat is an important source of heat in winter.
However, the coat needs to be cared for. It has to be removed, knots and the fur thoroughly combed or brushed. Matted fur does not hold off snow or cold rain effectively and does not insulate against the cold as well.

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Paw care
So that the dog does not run his paws sore, it is recommended to care for them with paw balm (winter care). Do not use petroleum jelly!
Paw balm protects the paw pads, makes them supple and protects them from the aggressive road salt and grit.
You should also make sure that the fur between the individual toes is kept short.

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Design your diet optimally
Dogs have the same energy requirements in winter as on hot days in summer. This means that the dog does not have to be fed additional "extras". Inevitably, this can lead to obesity. However, the dog's immune system should be strengthened with additional vitamins and vital substances (e.g. vegetables, fresh herbs, medicinal mushrooms, etc.).
For dogs that have a very short coat without an undercoat or a light coat, it is advisable to increase the intake of carbohydrates a little on very cold days. But don't forget to monitor your weight!
In general, however, the following applies:
More food is only justified if the dog lives outside or for breeds that are particularly active over the winter months.

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avoid stress
Dogs suffering from chronic stress or constantly stressed people around them are more prone to infections.

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Ensure a balanced rest / movement balance
In dogs, this is often in imbalance, and most dog owners today tend to over-employ their dogs.
However, it is normal for dogs to spend up to 20 hours a day resting / sleeping.

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See also article from August:

What bothers dogs about their humans!
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